Archive for wargrinder

A Child for the Warrior King, pt.3: The Hound

Posted in 40k, Chaos, Conversions, WIP, World Eaters with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 30, 2018 by krautscientist

With the ETL VI deadline fast approaching, this last week was mostly given over to the task of completing my Renegade Armiger Warglaive, and I would very much like to share my progress on this project with you today! It wasn’t all smooth sailing, either, because Germany has been in the iron grip of a heat wave for quite a while now, with temperatures solidly in the mid-30s Celsius degrees for most of last week — certainly not unheard of in other parts of the world, but not something we are all that used to in my particular neck of the woods…

But I soldiered on regardless, so let’s take a look at what I have to show for my perseverance:

Here’s where we left off last time:

The biggest task at this point was to paint the bigger amour plates for the legs as well as the top carapace. In order to save myself some time, I decided to use GW’s Mephiston Red spray as an undercoat for the armour plates. But while it did end up laying down a nice, even coat of red, the red was also fairly flat and chalky — so I did end up re-painting all the red areas anyway…

In the end, it probably did save me some time, after all, but it was certainly not a game changer on par with, say, the Leadbelcher spray.

Anyway, I tackled the armour plates one after another, picking out the various details and blocking in the different colours. The biggest piece of work was the top carapace, of course, so that’s where I started. Here it is, with most of the detail already blocked in:

As you can see, I also added some decals during this stage: These days, I never save the decals until everything else has been painted, because that will invariable make them look tacked on, almost like an afterthought. By applying them sooner, they can be weathered and damaged along with the rest of the model, as needed, in order to actually make them look more realistic. Now in this case, this only really involved a subtle pass of sepia wash to make them look just a bit more natural, but it’s a habit I have picked up. Besides, none of them were in the way of the eventual highlighting, so that helped, too 😉


Some of the decals were actually chosen to tie the model into the lore of my World Eaters army: The paw print hints at Gilgamesh’s honorary membership in the Legio Audax, the “Ember Wolves” (while the Titan Legio is an actual part of the background, as of “Betrayer”, I did make up Gilgamesh’s membership in it as part of my own head canon).

Meanwhile, the numerals on the right pauldron stand for the XII Legion’s IVth company — mirroring a similar marking on Gilgamesh’s right shoulder guard:


So here’s what the carapace looked like at this stage:


And here it is, a short while later, with all of the missing detail painted and a pretty serious (at least for my standard) amount of highlighting in place:

The rest of the armour plates were given the same treatment, and while none of this is any award winning stuff, the subtly higlighted red ended up looking quite a bit deeper than the armour on Gilgamesh, while still fitting the overall look: While the Armiger should still look like it belongs, it also shows off how I have grown as a painter over the last couple of years, and I like that, to be honest 😉

So anyway, here’s the Armiger in its almost finished state:

At this point, I made a To Do list for myself listing all the small cleanup work and small tweaks I still needed to do before the model would be finished. I also made an eleventh hour decision to diverge from the original conversion, as the original plan had been to add some marauder shields on top of the Armiger’s pauldrons, for an even more baroque, chaotic look. Like so:

But when I added them to the pauldrons, I just couldn’t shake the feeling that the model actually worked better without them, so after hemming and hawing and asking for feedback over at the forums, I eventually decided to leave them off — something about them just didn’t quite click with me, while the model did seem complete enough without them.

So at this point it was mainly a matter of checking all of the boxes on my To Do list, one after another.

One area of notice was the detailing of the cockpit and reactor section, and I am pretty happy with how that area came out. Take a look:


For the cockpit displays, I chose an approach I had seen on a Knight by fellow hobbyist Noigrim — I really liked the idea of approaching enemies being visible as red dots on the radar 😉

And here’s a closer look at the reactor section:

This is how the whole assembly looks when seen from the side, by the way:

From a conversion perspective, this is probably the most involved customisation on the entire model, but I do think it has been worth it.

The other big thing to take care of was the base. Here’s the completed build I came up with:


Gilgamesh’s base uses several pieces of broken imperial statuary (courtesy of GW’s “Honoured Imperium” terrain kit), and I thought it would be cool to match that look, albeit on a slightly smaller scale. So the base was built around a shattered statue’s broken sword (once again, a very apt metaphor for the failing Imperium of Man, and all that), and I used different kinds of slate, sand and cork to build up a suitable amount of rubble and texture around it all. The main floor texture was, once again, created using Vallejo’s Sandy Paste.

I also did a preliminary dry fitting to find out wether the model would fit neatly onto the base:

And after that, it was off to the painting desk for one last time. Here’s the finished base, completed a short while later:

As you can see, some skulls and broken Ultramarines armour pieces were also added to the base, if only to tie the model into the 28mm scale a bit better (and make for smaller areas of visual interest).

And with that, my Renegade Armiger was finished. So let’s take a look at the model, shall we?

 

The Hound

Enkidu Lance
attached to the XII Legion’s 4th assault company

 








And a couple of detail shots, of course:

First up, the Armiger with its carapace removed and a closer look at the pilot:

The plan was to make the pilot look similar to Gilgamesh’s pilot, the Baron Harrowthorne:

At the same time, I wanted it to be fairly obvious that the Hound is below the Baron in rank, so his uniform is just a bit plainer. I think the finished look works pretty well:

The top carapace will – obviously – stay removable, if only because it allows me to show off the custom cockpit and pilot every once in a while 😉 In fact, the entire model retains a certain amount of modularity:


This should provide a nice extra bit of flexibility once the second Armiger (codenamed “The Huntress”) has been completed! Incidentally, the harpoon arm I shared with you in my previous post will actually serve as the Huntress’ stock armament…

Here’s a side view that gives you a better idea of the detail work on the undercarriage:

The amount of detail on the Armiger’s skeleton owes a lot to the “JeffTibbetts school of Knight painting”, as it were 😉

Another area of the model I want to showcase is the banner between the Armiger’s legs:


While loyalist Armigers appear a lot less draped in personal heraldry than their Imperial Knight masters, I wanted to invoke the impression that Armiger pilots may serve their lords for far longer in the Great Eye, so it seemed appropriate to include a banner showing the pilot’s battle honours: It shows both the World Eaters’ legion badge as well as the War Hounds’ old symbol — probably a shout out to the Hound’s epithet.

At the same time, I also wanted to make the banner look more rugged than the banner on the bigger Knight, so I painted it as some kind of roughly tanned hide. I used the approach outlined in Brandon’s tutorial here, with a couple of minor tweaks, and am pretty happy with the finished effect.

Oh, and I also finally managed to take a picture of the face that shows of the Armiger’s glowing eye:

The missing optical sensor on the right side was originally a consequence of a slight miscast of the face, but I think it gives the model an even more sinister and chaotic look, so it actually works in its favour, wouldn’t you agree? 😉

Oh, and here’s a picture of the Armiger and my Renegade Knight Titan, Gilgamesh, “The Warrior King” — “Father and Son”, so to speak:

In fact, I discovered that my older Wargrinder conversion could actually work as an Armiger fairly well, at least from a scale perspective:

And with that, I have managed to finish both my entry for this year’s ETL event as well as my contribution to Azazel’s “Jewel of July” challenge. Pretty nifty, eh? 😉 To be honest, I am immensely pleased with the finished model — I actually put this off as long as I could, and I really had to force myself to start painting, but I couldn’t be any happier with the result. That being said, this has been a pretty involved project, so I think I’ll allow myself a bit of rest and mostly focus on small fry for a bit 😉

But anyway, so far for my first Renegade Armiger Warglaive. It goes without saying that I would love to hear your feedback on the model, so leave me a comment! And, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

Engine of destruction, pt. 3

Posted in 40k, Chaos, Conversions, Fluff, paintjob, World Eaters with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 6, 2013 by krautscientist

One more look at the Wargrinder, like I promised. I hope I’m not boring you yet! That said, it is a fairly involved project that I am also rather proud of, so I hope you’ll forgive me for featuring it prominently whenever I can…

Anyway, the last thing needed to complete the model was a suitable base. And the fact that the standard Dreadknight base is rather large also meant that I couldn’t exactly phone it in . So I sat down and thought about what I actually wanted the base to accomplish from a visual perspective:

  • I wanted the base to fit the look of my army’s overall basing scheme, obviously. So it was clear that I would use the same rock/rubble look.
  • I wanted the base to look interesting enough to do the model justice, but not so impressive as to draw away attention from it.
  • it would be really cool if the base could feature a fallen enemy of the Wargrinder.

So with these ideas in mind, I started to mess around with a couple of ideas. I obviously used the usual recipe of big and small pieces of cork plus some modelling sand and slate to represent the rocky ground and debris. Yet what about the fallen enemy? Covering the base in skulls would certainly have seemed slightly goofy, since the Wargrinder doesn’t have any obvious way of harvesting skulls in the traditional sense, due to its enormous size. So it had to be a bigger enemy, preferredly one with a certain reputation when it came to ferocity in combat.

Fortunately enough, I still had the torso front of a Death Company Dreadnought lying around from way back when I converted my first Chaos Dreadnought from a Furioso kit. I had always wanted to use that nicely detailed piece, and now was the time! So I added the remains of a defeated Blood Angels Dread to the base:

Wargrinder base (1)
I didn’t have a whole Dreadnought to spare, of course, so I wanpushed into the earth under theted its remains to look half buried, probably flattened and  trampled underfoot. In order to achieve this effect, I covered the middle of the base in a mix of wood glue, modelling sand and cork chaff. After the material had been evenly distributed, I added the torso front on top. I also built the remains of a torn off arm from a Dreadnought fist and a hydraulic strut from the Dreadknight. Then I added more sand and cork on top to blend everything together. And if you take a closer look, you can see some actual cables, representing the torn cabling emerging from the Dreadnought’s destroyed torso. And you may even spot the areas where I used a pen to sketch the outlines of the Wargrinder’s feet in order to make sure everything would fit together in the end.

When everything was nice and dry, the base was spraypainted with Chaos Black. As per my usual routine, the next step was to block in the base colours. Then everything was washed with brown wash. Then I went back in to do the accents and detail work. I tried to replicate the “official” Death Company paint scheme fairly closely (finding out once again the loyal Marines really aren’t for me when it comes to painting). Afterwards, I used a mix of washes, drybrushing and weathering effects to create scratches, chipped paint and battle damage on the fallen Dread. Here’s the finished base:

Wargrinder base (4)
I am reasonably pleased with the result: The fallen machine clearly reads as a Death Company Dread, and it adds a nice visual flourish to the base without the thread of overpowering the actual model. So the last step was to actually glue the Wargrinder to the base, and it was with slightly shaky hands that I completed this last task.

After enough drying time has elapsed, let’s take a look at the completely finished model. I give you the Wargrinder on its new base:

Wargrinder (18)
Wargrinder (19)
Wargrinder (20)
Wargrinder (21)
Wargrinder (22)
Wargrinder (23)
Wargrinder (24)
Wargrinder (25)
Granted, it’s just a relatively small detail when compared to the rest of the model, but it does really make the Wargrinder look complete. I also think it’s a nice bit of irony that a Death Company Dreadnought, itself well known for its ferocity in combat, has been reduced to a mere base decoration here 😉

Here are some additional detail shots:

Wargrinder (28)
The Wargrinder towering over its fallen foe.

Wargrinder (29)
By the way, PDH found the perfect excuse for the icon of Khorne on the model’s back being the wrong way around: “It’s for when Khorne’s looking down on him.” — yes, that’s a brilliant explanation, and much better than admitting that I didn’t pay enough attention, so let’s just go with that!

Wargrinder (32)

Wargrinder (33)
All in all, I am really happy to have completed this model! It’s been some work alright, although I feel the result is well worth it:

Wargrinder (30)

Incidentally, after posting the model, it turned out that the choice of head remains a point of critcism for some. Now I do of course realise that it’s a fairly eclectic choice, and it will never please everybody. That said, at least there was some method to my madness. Fellow hobbyist TJWyrm over on B&C really put it more succinctly in his comment than I ever could have:

For me, the head really helps trace a lineage back to the Legion Maniple robots, one that was dragged with your guys into the warp, and is still serving millenia later.

While I didn’t have it all worked out like that from the start, my plan for the model was that the Wargrinder is neither a dreadnought-like sarcophagus for the remains of an Astartes, nor a daemon’s spirit given metallic form. Rather, it is actually supposed to be an enhanced and somewhat redesigned Legio Cybernetica robot (as a matter of fact, even though I only disvovered this after the fact, it does bear some structural similarities to the Lambda Zeta-01 Combat Class Robot): Maybe it has been serving the 4th assault company ever since the Heresy, and Warpsmith Deracin just made some additions and alterations to the machine. Maybe it has been constructed by Deracin himself, using the remains of Mechanicus warmachines and the dark secrets of his craft. In any case, the machine isn’t a frenzied daemon, but rather an emotionless, uncaring killing machine. And I think the head I chose is a better representation of that than any frenzied daemon face. That said, it’s certainly purely a matter of taste, and I acknowledge that not everyone will like my choice. I am certainly not making excuses, just trying to explain my reasoning on this. For those who really cannot stomach the head, I’ll happily point you towards Chris’ Dreadknight conversion once again. It uses a Necrosphinx head and looks awesome!

So yeah, that’s the finished model in all its glory. But what will I ever use it for?
To be perfectly honest, I mainly started this project due to the prospect of being able to convert and paint an awesome model. Still, there are a number of possible in-game uses for the Wargrinder, of course: The most obvious choice would be to use it as a Decimator. The size of the model is similar, and using it in that capacity would be a great way of having access to a Decimator without having to get the “official” model, The small problem here is the WYSIWYG rule: The base is quite a bit bigger than the Decimator’s standard base — and I simply refused to glue the Wargrinder to a smaller base, because that could have looked rather ridiculous. Still, while I didn’t try to model for advantage, the fact remains that the bigger base may make things ever so slightly easier for me 😉 The other problem is the model’s weapon: I just used the leftover Forgefiend weapon because I liked the look of it, but it doesn’t really represent either equipment choice available to a Decimator all that well. Still, with a little goodwill on my opponent’s part, the Wargrinder would certainly make for a pretty cool counts as Decimator.

It could also be used as a counts as Forgefiend, Maulerfiend or even Defiler, come to think of it. Sure, each of these options will once again require an understanding opponent, but the bottom line remains the same: Even though my main objective was to build and paint a badass-looking model, the Wargrinder could very well come in handy on the table as well!

So, before I wind up this post, it’s good tradition here on Eternal Hunt to present some fluff to go with the new model. So here’s all you need to know about the Wargrinder:

Wargrinder (27)
Wargrinder pattern Blood Knight

The warmachine designated Wargrinder by the legionaries of the 4th assault company is certainly a terrifying testament to Huntmaster Deracin’s dark genius. Bigger even than the fearsome Contemptor, the Wargrinder usually towers over the battlefield, a metallic embodiment of murderous intent.

Based on the ancient and hallowed warmachines of the Legio Cybernetica that fought alongside the XIIth Astartes Legion during the Great Crusade and subsequent Horus Heresy, the Wargrinder has evolved into something altogether different: While there are still enough hints as to its origin, the machine’s armoured bulk now resembles nothing so much as the form of a traitor Astartes, its baroque armour plating and daemonic weapons a clear indicator of its allegiance. and its fluid, almost organic, movements terrifying to behold.

While the Wargrinder is infused with the energies of the warp, it remains a machine: In eerie contrast to the frenzied and bloodthirsty traitor Astartes fighting alongside it,  the daemon engine’s relentless advance betrays the precision of an automaton: A Wargrinder never tires, never retreats, until its task is done. But where an organic follower of Khorne would leave himself be consumed by his instinct and his rage, it remains emotionless and calculating, its behavioral protocols ensuring its murderous efficiency.

In the armies of Khorne’s Eternal Hunt, Wargrinders fill a combat role similar to that of the accursed Decimator daemon engine. Equippable both for short and long range combat, a Wargrinder is a highly versatile warmachine. It is also a terror weapon, frightening to behold to those standing against the 4th. And a chilling reminder that even the most sophisticated machines ever devised by mankind may be turned against the servants of the false Emperor…

 

So there you have it: I hope this little series about building and painting the Wargrinder has been interesting to pursue! As always, feel free to let me know what you think in the comments! I’d love to hear from you!

And, of course, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

Wargrinder (26)

Engine of destruction, pt. 2

Posted in 40k, Chaos, Conversions, paintjob, WIP, World Eaters with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 30, 2013 by krautscientist

Right, I promised you that you wouldn’t have to wait long for the next update on my Dreadknight/Decimator conversion, so here goes. Let me begin by admitting that I’m a little disappointed by the lack of reactions to the painted model so far: That really doesn’t bode well for the publich opinion on this guy, I suppose. Let’s just hope people are holding back all their constructive feedback for the finished model…

Anyway, back to the matter at hand! Here’s where we left off last time:

Wargrinder PIP (5)
Time to get this bad boy some arms, right? Unfortunately, I didn’t take any PIP photos of the arms, as I painted them in one, frantic session, eager to finally see the model completely assembled and painted! Once again, the arms were detailed enough to almost be counted as models in their own right, yet the slightly bigger size made painting them a fairly pleasant affair.

I also made a list of all the little details that I had yet to paint and used the time it took for the paint on the arms to dry to get all the fiddly detail and additional accents out of the way.

When all the different sub-assemblies had been completed, the time had come to carefully glue everything together. While maybe I should have gone out to pick up some really strong superglue before putting everything together, I really couldn’t wait until the next day when I had finished all the components at about ten in the evening. So I used a couple of items to stabilise the position of the arms, while the model was resting on my keyboard, no less – yes, talk about patience and professionalism…  😉

Wargrinder PIP (17)
But after leaving the model to dry overnight, everything was stable enough, and the model itself was finally completed.

So now it’s finally time to take a look at the assembled model. Meet the Wargrinder, ladies and gentlemen:

Wargrinder (10)
Wargrinder (9)
Wargrinder (8)
Wargrinder (7)
Wargrinder (6)
Wargrinder (5)
Wargrinder (4)
Wargrinder (3)
Wargrinder (2)
Wargrinder (1)
Quite a beast, don’t you think? The arms do a pretty good job of making it look even less than a stock Dreadknight and more like a daemon engine. And as you can see, some final detail was added during the assembly process: Two Ogre gut plates were once again used to represent the World Eaters’ legion badge. And two semi-circular trophy racks from the chaos vehicle sprue provide some additional chaos flair while also bulking out the model’s silhouette some more.

Let’s take a look at a couple of details:

Wargrinder (13)
Like I said before, I realise that the head probably isn’t for anybody. But I am rather happy with the way it turned out: The model looks like an emotionless, relentless killing machine, and that’s exactly the look I wanted to achieve. And even if you don’t like the head, it should really be easy to find a suitable replacement, in case somebody is planning a similar conversion.

I also used one of my beloved, simple OSL effects on the weapon arm’s plasma coils:

Wargrinder (14)
The huge coils are really an open invitation to painters to go for an effect like that, and even though I kept it all rather simple, the finished arm makes for a nice eyecatcher.

Wargrinder (17)
Another look at the model’s back: The exhaust pipes were given a pass of Vallejo Smoke Ink to make them look even more dark and grimy. I am also very much in love with that brass etched symbol of Khorne sponsored by PDH!

 

To tell you the truth, all in all, I probably couldn’t be any happier with the model: The different head (while clearly a case of love it or hate it) makes it different enough from Chris’ conversion so as not to seem like a retread of the same idea. And the paintjob really ties together the different parts, making them look like they were meant to be used in that way. Painting this guy also was a real blast!

I am still not 100% done, though: The base still needs to be built and painted — and it goes without saying that a model as imposing as this deserves a suitably impressive base to go with it. Fortunately, I already have an idea, although it may take some time for me to get around to actually completing it.

Until then, I would love to hear your opinion on the model, so feel free to drop me a line or two in the comments section! And, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

Wargrinder (16)

Engine of destruction, pt. 1

Posted in 40k, Chaos, Conversions, paintjob, WIP, World Eaters with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2013 by krautscientist

So, time to revisit that mysterious model from the fuzzy teaser shot, I think. Some of you may already have recognised the model in question, and to tell you the truth, ever since I built my converted Dreadknight / counts as Decimator (inspired by Chris’ fantastic conversion over at A Host of Word Bearers), I’ve been itching to get this big boy painted. While painting the model seemed like a rather daunting task at first, painting my various Chaos Dreadnoughts has taught me that models at a slightly bigger scale can be real fun to paint, if only because the actual painting can be less fiddly due to the increased size.

In any case, there was really only one way to find out…

So, how did it go? Just to remind you, here’s where we left off last time:

kitbashed Decimator WIP (9)
Before breaking out the paints, I used the last possible opportunity to add some final bitz: A chaos smoke launcher was cut in half, with both halves added to the cowling behind the model’s head. A chain with dangling skulls was also added to the reactor on the model’s back.

The next step was to break down the model into the different sub assemblies and get everything undercoated in chaos black. Thankfully, this was pretty fast work. Here’s most of the model undercoated and tacked together (again):

Wargrinder PIP (1)
I then started painting the different sub assemblies, starting with the legs. Fortunately enough, my predicition proved correct: Painting the model turned out to be quite a lot of fun!

While larger models take much more paint to be completed, you can also cover much more ground and work with larger brushes, without having to worry about all the small nooks and crannies — at least at first…

So a short while later, the legs were basically finished:

Wargrinder PIP (2)
At this point, I really liked where this was going and I was basically hooked. So I pressed on, painting the torso next…

Wargrinder PIP (3)
As you can see, the amount of cables and metal doodads on the torso front meant that I could use a healthy dose of washes to make the metal look suitably dark and oily. I was also happy to finally see the head painted (but we’ll take a closer look at that in a minute). The last parts for the torso to be painted were the armour plates for the model’s chest. I quickly finished these, then tacked together what I had so far:

Wargrinder PIP (11)
Wargrinder PIP (10)
Wargrinder PIP (9)
Wargrinder PIP (8)
Wargrinder PIP (7)
Wargrinder PIP (6)
I am actually pretty pleased with the WIP model so far. The paintjob already does a fairly good job of blending together the different parts used in the conversion.

On a related note, I realise that the use of a head from an 80s’ toy was a point of contention for some. So my hope was that the paintjob would go a ways towards making it look like an actual part of the model. Take a look:

Wargrinder PIP (12)
While I am pretty sure that this particular choice of head will never make everybody happy, I am pretty pleased with the result: I don’t think it looks that much like an action figure any more. As you can see, I also added a simple blending effect on the models visor, trying to ride the cylon motif for all that it’s worth 😉

A brass etched symbol of Khorne (kindly sponsored by PDH — cheers, mate!) was added to the armour plate on the model’s shoulders:

Wargrinder PIP (14)
You may say that it looks like it’s the wrong way around: a result of the plate originally being positioned slightly differently. In any case, it fits much better this way around anyway, so there is little to be done.

Again, I am really pretty happy with the model so far, even though it’s not yet complete: The next step, obviously, is to paint the model’s arms. And, of course, a suitably impressive base will have to be designed and painted at some point. Expect the next update pretty soon, though, because I am rather stoked for finishing this model.

Until then, feel free to let me know what you think in the comments! And, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

Wargrinder PIP (15)