Archive for mummy

#HeroQuest2019: A small relapse…

Posted in Conversions, heroquest, old stuff, Orcs & Goblins, paintjob with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2019 by krautscientist

Hey everyone, I am currently working on lots of neat projects that I hope I’ll be able to share with you soon. But for today, let us return to my #HeroQuest2019 project, as I find myself drawn back to the world of adventures in a world of high fantasy fairly frequently.

The reason for this is twofold: One the one hand, this has been such an enjoyable project that I just want to keep adding things to it. On the other hand, finishing a HeroQuest model rarely takes longer than an hour or so, so it’s always a fun romp that usually ends in success. And, with the main game system taken care of, I am now free to fill out some blank areas on the map and go above and beyond what’s required for the base game. Plus I may actually have a proper game of HeroQuest coming up later this month, so I had best get my stuff in order until then ๐Ÿ˜‰

One very enjoyable option for HeroQuest aficionados is to come up with custom models for characters or monsters that appear in the quests but don’t have dedicated models. I’ve already created several custom models like that, and it has been a lot of fun:

But once you take your first step down this road, there’s a real temptation not to stop before every character has their own dedicated model, and so I keep looking at the HeroQuest quest book for new inspiration. Case in point, “The Trial” from the second edition quest book has a more powerful mummy in it that is described as the corpse of a legendary warrior. And I knew I had an old Tomb Kings skeleton head in my bitzbox that might work rather well for glitzing up a standard mummy…

I started with an (already horribly painted) stock mummy model that was in pretty rough shape — hence I had no qualms about cutting it up ๐Ÿ˜‰

And I used some plastic bits to turn it into a mummy champion, so to speak:


Now the bitz I used for this conversion are all a bit more modern than the actual HQ models, but I still think the vintage look is retained. It’s also a really simple conversion, mostly based on swapping in a skeleton head and hand from the old Tomb Kings skeleton warriors, as well as an ancient skeleton hand with sword.

The fun with these conversions is that the aim is not only to convert something that looks cool, but, more importantly, a model that seems plausible within the framework of the vintage HeroQuest look.

Anyway, there was that wonderful moment when the undercoat pulled all of the disparate parts together:

And here’s the finished mummy champion:


The finished model does betray the fact that the mummy I used was in a pretty rough state — working from a “clean” stock model would arguably have led to an even better result. But I am still pretty happy with the model.

One thing that doesn’t photograph too well, unfortunately, but works really well when seen up close, is the glowing eyes and mouth areas:

The glow that’s only suggested in the photo is really arresting when looking at the model from up close.

And here’s a comparison shot with the champion and a standard mummy:

Yup, definitely the embalmed corpse of a powerful warrior, and not just your standard, run-of-the-mill mummy. Yessir ๐Ÿ˜‰

Come to think of it, the Return of the Witch Lord expansion has a quest with four special undead monsters called the “Spirit Riders”, and this recipe would probably work really well for them, too. Now if I can just cobble together enough old Tomb King heads… ๐Ÿ˜‰

 

The second model I want to share with you today works in a similar way: It’s also a stock HeroQuest model, slightly converted to represent a special character. In this case, it’s a model to count as Grak, the son of the Orc warlord Ulag, defeated by the heroes during an early quest:

As you can see, the conversion is based on a standard HQ Orc: I wanted him to look less like a warlord like his father. In the quest book, Grak kidnaps the heroes after they have slain (or “captured”, if you own the German edition of HeroQuest) his father. Now maybe his kidnapping of the heroes is not only an act to avenge his father, but also to prove how he can become the next Orc warlord. His one bid for power that he must not mess up. But while he may be formidable in a fight, I also wanted him to look like a bit of a doofus ๐Ÿ˜‰

The conversion itself was really simple: I merely spliced in some plastic Orc and Goblin bitz. The most important part was Grak’s silly little hood, created by shaving down an old Night Goblin head. Truth be told, the entire Idea was mostly nicked from Luegisdorf’s very nice HeroQuest collection over here, to give credit where credit is due.

Converting Grak was quick work, and so was painting him: I went from blocking in the main colours…

…to an almost finished model in just about an hour:

Again, I really love how knocking out a HeroQuest character or two serves as a nice and easy little palate cleanser every now and then! Anyway, here’s the finished model for Grak, completely painted and varnished:



And here he is next to his dear old father Ulag, both ready to be slain by an enterprising group of heroes

And one last model for today: I really wanted to figure out proper colour schemes for the Men-at-Arms that come with both HeroQuest (at least with the Advanced Quest version) and Advanced HeroQuest:

Seeing how the twelve Men-at-Arms from HeroQuest are the one thing in the box I have yet to paint, I thought it would be smart to start with one of them — and boy oh boy was that less fun than expected:

Don’t get me wrong, I am rather happy with the finished look: It’s renaissanc-y enough to match the model’s design, and also clean and bright enough for HeroQuest’s particular high fantasy flavour (even though those guys are very obviously proto-Empire State Troops).

The way to get to the finished model was less than enjoyable, mostly due to the face: Now the detailing on the face was fairly soft to begin with (with the eyes more suggested than actually sculpted), and the fact that the models have a massive mold line running down the centre of their faces didn’t exactly help. I didn’t end up with much in the way of facial features, so I basically had to paint on a face with the brush. It took quite some doing, and the guy certainly isn’t a natural beauty, but at least he has a face now:


I also realised the guy wouldn’t really qualify as a proper test model without the different weapon alternatives, so I quickly painted those as well:

The Scout:


The Halberdier:

The Swordsman:

The Crossbowman:


So yeah, one down, eleven to go ๐Ÿ˜‰ Anyway, I want to keep most of the colour scheme for all of the other Men-at-Arms, with the helmet plume as a way of distinguishing different players’ mercenaries.

So that’s it for today. Dealing with those vintage models is always a wonderful fresh breath of air for me, but that may just be nostalgia. But no, those models are rather lovely in their simplicity and unabashed high fantasy look and feel. Good times! ๐Ÿ™‚

It goes without saying that I would love to hear your thoughts on the latest models! And, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

 

 

#HeroQuest2019: The Walking Dead

Posted in heroquest, old stuff, paintjob with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2019 by krautscientist

More #HeroQuest 2019 this week — after completing a bunch of Orcs, I turned my eyes to all of the undead creatures appearing in HeroQuest. And I still remember how I was very much in love with the undead models back when I first received the game: I had a huge thing for skeletons back then, for some reasons (I blame Masters of the Universe), and I still remember simply being blown away when I saw John Blanche’s “Skeleton Horde” illustration on the back cover of HeroQuest’s “Return of the Witch Lord” expansion quest book:

“Skeleton Horde” by John Blanche

Once again, I had already painted some test models back in 2014, and my testers also featured a proof of concept for each of the undead creatures appearing in the game:

Of those three, I liked the Zombie the best, so that’s where I started — I also feel the Zombie is one of the best monster sculpts to appear in the HeroQuest box: It’s such a deceptively simple model, but between the effective pose, the sinister looking weapon, and the surprising amount of detail, this guy is really one of my favourites. Maybe that’s the reason because one of the HeroQuest Zombies was the very first model I have ever tried to paint:

 

“AHHH! IT BURNNNNSSSS!” ๐Ÿ˜‰

My first painting steps notwithstanding, I was still pretty happy with my 2014 proof-of-concept:


So I decided to stick to the original recipe fairly closely. Unfortunately enough, I was not quite able to match the greenish tinge of the skin, seeing how it was originally achieved by using an old GW Green Ink that has since dried up for good. I still did my best to make the models look suitably moldy, though, and here’s what I ended up with:


Funnily enough, I painted these while watching Christopher Odd’s playthrough of the Resident Evil Remake on YouTube, which seemed like a pretty good match ๐Ÿ˜‰

As you can see, I once again added some variation to their clothes, so as not to end up with six models that were completely alike. Oh, and I allowed myself one small kitbash, swapping in an axe blade from an old Warhammer Skeleton kit. The weapons have that certain HeroQuest clunkiness, so I think it works rather well:

So with the Zombies finished, I next turned my attention to the Skeletons.

For the 2014 test model, I used a very simple approach of brushing the bone colour directly onto the brown undercoat:

It seemed like a good idea at the time, and if nothing else, it made for a bit of contrast on the model. It also led to a somewhat dirty and dusty look, however, and I really wanted to look my Skeletons look much more bleached, and maybe a tad cleaner. So for the new models, while I still used drybrushing, I went for a lighter colour overall and basecoated the entire Skeleton in GW Rakarth Flesh before washing and drybrushing. And I think it worked pretty well:

Here’s a direct comparison between the old and new recipe, and I think the new approach works far better:

The rusty scythe was definitely a keeper, though, so I kept the look ๐Ÿ˜‰

What was really nice was how quickly I was able to bang out eight Skeletons (and I’ll even need another for to have everything I need to play the “Return of the Witch Lord” expansion). Here they are:

And finally, the mummies. Once again, there was a 2014 version…

…and while it worked well enough, I felt the models needed a little more contrast. So I threw in an extra drybrushing stage (and used a general recipe very close to that of the new Skeletons). Anyway, these guys were probably the quickest of the bunch to be finished, and I am pretty happy with them:

So all in all, this means another bunch of models for HeroQuest and a whopping twenty models to cross off my list. Take a look at my little undead army here:

Oh, and since those models were all painted back in February, I’ll consider them another contribution to Azazel’s “Neglected Models” challenge one again ๐Ÿ˜‰

Truth be told, there’s actually one more undead model that I haven’t shown to you yet — but that’s a subject for another time, as I would say the …gentleman in question very much deserves his own post…

Until then, I would of course love to hear what you think, so drop me a comment! And, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more! ๐Ÿ™‚