More 30k World Eaters — and a recipe for bloodshed

Having already teased some additional painted 30k World Eaters in my last post, I think it’s only proper to take a closer look at these models today. Some of you may remember that my first 30k test model ended up quite alright, but also that I didn’t find the process of painting white armour all that enjoyable.

Well, no more. Because I have actually manage to tweak my recipe for 30k World Eaters so as to be far less time consuming and nerve-wracking. Which made my second test model far more enjoyable to paint than the first one! So without further ado, here’s the model:

2nd 30k World Eater (1)
“To the prim and proper XIIIth or the bleeding heart XVIIIth, the thought of Astartes killing Astartes is anathema.
But we have been doing this for decades, night after night, in the cages and on the hot dust.
The only difference is that there is no longer any need to hold back.”

Legionary Sarn, Eigar Veteran Tactical squad, 4th assault company, XII Legion Astartes

 

2nd 30k World Eater (2)

2nd 30k World Eater (3)

2nd 30k World Eater (4)

2nd 30k World Eater (5)

2nd 30k World Eater (7)

Regarding the parts I chose for the model, I spliced in some CSM arms and a Khorne berzerker torso. While the finished model seems like a fairly standard marine at first glance, it retains a certain sense of brutality that works well for the World Eaters, I think. Using CSM arms on the Betrayal at Calth plastics also allows for slightly more interesting poses. And the spiked and barbed CSM weapons are an excellent fit for World Eaters weaponry, without looking too chaotic — in fact, maybe this is Sarum pattern equipment, provided by the Forgeworld of the same name that the World Eaters liberated during the latter stages of the Great Crusade…?

As for painting the model, the main change to my original recipe was to use GW Corax White spraypaint for the white undercoat instead of having to paint it all on by brush. This really cut down on the time it took me to complete the model, plus it also reduced the number of somewhat iffy areas that needed further touchups. What’s more, having an easier time with the basic paintjob gave me the liberty to experiment with some additional effects.

The first of those was the blood: It was clear of course that blood would have to enter the picture at some point, so I chose this model as a test piece for that as well, trying to create an effect that would subtly enhance the model without overpowering it. I actually used a tootbrush to flick small amounts of Tamiya Clear Red at the model, in order to create realistic patterns. Then I went back and added some more blood to select areas of the model, such as the chainblade and the knee. I think it’s fun to apply the blood in a very deliberate manner, rather than just slathering it on. That way, figuring out how the blood may actually have gotten there in the first place turns into an interesting bit of meta-narrative — did this guy knee his opponent in the face, for instance? 😉

I also added another decal to the right shoulder pad: A “XII” numeral (actually a cut-down XIII from the Betrayal at Calth decal sheet):

2nd 30k World Eater (8)

And I included the pauldron of a fallen Armaturan Evocatus on the model’s base, trampled underfoot during the battle, maybe?

2nd 30k World Eater (6)

All in all, I am really rather happy with the World Eaters recipe I have come up with! It’s fairly effective and pretty fast to pull off, especially if, like me, you don’t like having to paint multiple thin layers of a base colour but enjoy the aspects of weathering and adding “special effects” far more.

30k legion badge

In fact, allow me to share my recipe — maybe those of you thinking about a 30k World Eaters project of their own will find this helpful.
So here’s a step by step tutorial for the white armour:

What you will need:

  • GW Corax White spraypaint
  • a white of your choice (I use Vallejo Dead White, but GW Ceramite White will work just the same)
  • GW Lahmian Medium (!)
  • a black and brown wash of your choice. I use Army Painter Strong Tone and Dark Tone, respectively, but GW Agrax Earthshade and GW Nuln Oil should also do the job.
  • a suitable dark brown/dark grey/green-brown colour for the sponge weathering. I use the OOP GW Charadon Granite (which is wonderful). However, any very dark grey/black/dark brown should work similarly well.

Oh, and one more piece of advice: You’ll make your life quite a bit easier if you leave the backpack and shoulder pads off and paint them separately. In fact, I even use a different undercoat for them (Chaos Black for the pauldrons and Chaos Black followed by Leadbelcher for the backpack). You can also leave off the head in order to be able to get into all the little nooks and crannies. However, all the following steps apply to both the head and body of the model.

So here we go:

Step 1: Spraypaint the entire model using GW Corax White. You get to decide how white you want your model to be during this step. For a slightly grey-ish off white, use the spraypaint sparingly. For a cleaner white, use a thicker coat of paint (or multiple passes of spraying). Make sure not to lay the colour on too thickly, though. This is what your model will look like afterwards:

Pre Heresy World Eaters white tutorial (1)
Step 2: After everything has dried, check to see whether there are any areas that remain unpainted. If so, this is the moment to use some slightly diluted white to clean them up a bit. As soon as that is finished, you should give the entire model a drybrushing with the same white, in order to build up a bit of contrast on the raised parts of the armour. It goes without saying that this will be more effective if you went for a slightly thinner undercoat beforehand.

Step 3: Now’s the time to block in all the different colours that aren’t white, i.e. the metallics, skin, trophies, pieces of cloth, pouches etc. This recipe won’t focus on my colour choices for this part, although I might do a more detailed tutorial in the future. Anyway, this is what the model will look like after this step:

Pre Heresy World Eaters white tutorial (2)
If you think it looks pretty terrible, you’re absolutely right. Don’t fret, as that’ll change in a minute 😉

One important thing, though: This is also the moment where you apply all the decals you want to go onto the armour, as we’ll need to weather them along with the armour to make them look realistic. So if you want to use any of those red World Eaters decals from Forgeworld, apply them now! After they are well dry, add a coat of matt varnish on top to seal them , just for hood measure.
This is also the last opportunity to clean up the white: Any errors that you don’t correct now will have to be covered up by the weathering later, so take another look at the areas that might require a bit of cleanup now!

Step 4: Here’s where it gets interesting: Mix a glaze using Lahmian Medium and your brown and black washes on your palette. No need for an exact recipe, although the Lahmian Medium should account for about 60-70% of the mixture, with the rest made up of the black and brown. You’ll also want slightly more black than brown for a World Eater, (while mixing in a lot more brown and little to no black would give you a pretty nice glaze for a Death Guard legionnaire, incidentally). Once you have mixed the colours together, quickly and generously paint them onto the white armour, and do it in one go, so as not to produce any ugly borders. The glaze will shade the armour without drying on the even surfaces in a splotchy way (as a mere wash would), while also giving the whole armour a slightly muddy and off-white quality. Here’s what the model will look like after this step:

Pre Heresy World Eaters white tutorial (3)
The picture is rather misleading in that it was taken late in the evening, in less than ideal lighting. I just wanted to keep painting instead of waiting for better light, so the photo isn’t as good as it should be. The white is just as bright as the white in the following picture, if not brighter, it just doesn’t appear that way.

Step 5: We’re almost there. Now give the model some time to dry (!) before you tackle the next step. When everything is nice and dry, you put some Charadon Granite (or your alternate dark brown/dark grey) onto your palette and use a small piece of blister sponge to dip into it. Then you should sponge off most of the colour back onto the palette or onto a piece of kitchen towel. When there’s just a bit of colour left, use the sponge to carefully add weathering to the surfaces of the armour. This is not an exact science, so you need to experiment a bit. You can also build up the effect in several layers. The sponge weathering will end up looking very organic, which is great, plus it’s really useful for covering up errors and ugly areas. Just keep in mind that you will also have to use the effect on the blue parts of the armour (i.e. the shoulder pads and backpack), so they won’t stick out later by being too clean.

Anyway, I added multiple layers of spomge weathering until I was happy. And here’s the mostly finished model:

Pre Heresy World Eaters white tutorial (4)
As you can see, the shoulder pad and backpack are already back in place. You can do this as soon as you no longer need access to every part of the armour. I also added a selective edge highlight to some raised parts of the armour, such as the helmet’s faceplate, the elbows, the armour plate covering the model’s stomach etc. Oh, and I brushed some Steel Legion Drab over the model’s feet and greaves, in order to create a visual connection with the base. Of course you’ll have to adjust this part, depending on the colour scheme you have chosen for your basing.

As for the blood, like I said above, I use Tamiya Clear Red (although I keep hearing good things about GW Blood for the Blood God as well, and it may be easier to source), flicking it at the armour with the help of a toothbrush and then adding some of the paint to select areas. When touching up the gore, you should mix in some brown and/or black wash, so you’ll get slightly different hues and saturations that will make the blood look more believable.

Oh, and let me speak about the blue parts as well: When I painted my first 30k World Eater, I didn’t have any suitable blue, so I just used Vallejo Magic Blue with a drop of black, mostly as a stopgap solution. However, I really like the colour that resulted from this, so I’ve decided to keep the recipe for the rest of my models.

Anyway, so much for the tutorial. Aftersome final touchups and a completed base, here’s what the model looks like now:

3rd 30k World Eater (1)

“You think we take our opponents’ skulls to mock them, Evocatus? Hah, quite the opposite!
Even in death, your eyes will be allowed to glimpse the battlefield once more — what greater honour could be bestowed upon a true warrior?”

Legionary Molax of the Triarii, XII Legion Astartes. Seconded to the 4th assault company following the Battle of Armatura.

3rd 30k World Eater (2)
3rd 30k World Eater (3)
3rd 30k World Eater (4)

Regarding the conversion itself, I wanted to experiment with a more gladiatorial look, which I believe turned out pretty convincing. I also spliced in some actual Khorne Berzerker parts to create the kind of “mongrel” plate that should have been a pretty regular occurence in the XII legion, considering its rather heads-on approach to warfare and the amount of losses taken during the outbreak of the Heresy and the subsequent Shadow War.

And here are all three test models I have painted so far:

30k World Eaters test models (3)
One thing you can see in the picture is how the ratio between the black and brown washes will slightly influence the colour of the armour: If you look closely, you’ll see that Molax is slightly more brownish than the other two. This is because I used slightly more brown wash when mixing the glaze for his armour. The other two models use less brown and more black, leading to a somewhat colder look.

Another thing that’s evident in the picture is how the models are quite a bit less uniform than the stock Betrayal of Calth tactical Marines. I really wanted my World Eaters to have a slightly more ragtag appearance, as this just seems appropriate for the legion. As I keep adding new models, I think some of them will look quite different, with the spectrum ranging from fairly standard Mk IV Marines to guys in far less standardised gear, yet I hope to include some visual touches that pull it all together, creating a feeling of visual coherency while also allowing for quite a bit of variation at the same time.

Speaking of which, here are the two 30k models I am currently working on:

Plasma Gunner and Triarius WIP (2)
Plasma Gunner and Triarius WIP (3)
The model on the right further explores the Triarii archetype, while the guy on the left is a pretty standard plasma gunner. Like I said, these may seem rather different when compared like this, but I do think they’ll work together rather nicely in the finished squad. And there’s always the option of spinning off the Triarii into their own squad somewhere along the way, of course.

In this particular case, the main challenge was to make the guy with the plasma gun look suitably massive and menacing and not like “that boring model with the gun”. I think I was fairly successful with that, though.

And there’s also another model that I am fairly excited about. This guy:

WE Praetor 30k WIP (2)
WE Praetor 30k WIP (1)
The model was originally built as an officer for my 40k World Eaters, but it seems as though he might make an even better officer for my small 30k project, even if he’s a bit more openly Khornate than the other guys so far — personally, I think that all bets were really off for the World Eaters after Armatura and Nuceria, so I imagine some Khornate elements will have begun to sneak into the legion by then — after all, they were definitely present shortly after the Heresy, according to Khârn: Eater of Worlds.

 

Anyway so much for the status of my little 30k project. Again, don’t expect this to grow into a fully-fledged Horus Heresy army any time soon! That being said, this project is a great way of exploring an earlier incarnation of my 40k World Eaters and of using ideas that I’ve always found cool but couldn’t make work on the 40k setting. So it’s definitely a win/win situation for now 😉

I would love to hear any feedback you might have! And as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

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30 Responses to “More 30k World Eaters — and a recipe for bloodshed”

  1. Nice work 🙂 The 30k armors look so much better than the 40k versions.

  2. Looking good mate. I’ll be reading over the tutorial carefully (working with a white basecoat has always proved to be an absolute nightmare for me). I especially like the officer – and I would have thought that in a legion like the World Eaters the officers would always be a step further down the road to damnation than the rest of the ranks, at least at the time of the Heresy. If they weren’t I doubt they’d keep their rank for long. Post-heresy of course they’d be the ones who were a little more in control and tactically minded – one of those nice little twists that really adds to the World Eaters’ story. Anyway I digress…

    Is there a design on the other side of the officer’s shield (symbol of khorne etc)?

    Also, on another note, I’m really enjoying the models you’ve produced for the Convertorum, some really inspiring stuff there as well. Keep up the good work!

    • Cheers, mate! Yeah, I feel similar about the Khornate influence in the legion. The shield does indeed have a Khorne rune on it — incidentally, the arms originally came from the WFB model that I used in one of those conversions from the Convertorum post!

  3. Very cool mate, nice formula for the off-white armour! Love the weathering & gore 🙂

  4. Fantastic conversions and paint job all around.

    Your white recipe is quite similar to one I have scribbled down in my notebook that I was going to try on some Deathwing terminators sometime in the future. I want them to be more classic white than the warm bone colour that they seem to be painted as now.

    I think I’m going to try your recipe too when I get around to it. And I’ll definitely keep in mind your advice on the Lhamian medium to washes ratio you mentioned. Maybe I will go a little more toward the brown.

    Thanks for the inspiration.

    • Hmm, come to think about it, I guess the recipe might even work for the “classic” Deathwing look if you were to replace the brown and black washes with sepia. One thing to keep in mind when going for whiter than usual Deathwing is that it’s easy to end up with models that don’t really read as Daathwing — I think From the Warp has a rather fascinating article on this particular subject, IIRC.

  5. Evening, great article bud. I’ve not tried my hand at weathering and I tend to avoid painting while like Nurgle’s Rot. However, your techniques make it sound pretty achievable without being a pain. Also, ace work. Your models really capture the gladiatorial feel of the legion while not being to full on. The pose of the shield and axe chap is boss.
    One question, and forgive me if this is rather dim, how do you glue/attach the shoulder pads, head, etc without messing up the paint work?
    Cheers very much.

    • Thanks for the kind words! I try my best to be helpful! 🙂 As for our question, the way I attach those extra parts depends on where they’ll be sitting on the model and how well the points of attachment work:When in doubt, I go for a drop of superglue, as that tends to setttle faster and make less of a mess of the paintjob. On the other hand, shoulder pads and backpacks usually have a point of attachment that is well enough disguised, so I can risk using plastic glue which makes for a stronger bond. Whatever you do, make sure to perform a test fitting before you use any glue!

      • Great stuff, thank you for the advice. I always enjoy checking out your articles, as you hit a nice balance between entertaining and informative (plus the pictures of awesome models is always a plus!). Have an ace one.

  6. *white. Damn it.

  7. Lovely work as per usual man. Love the blood work. I did the whole “Dexter” thing too on my recent project. Worked out exactly where the blood would flick and spray with a swipe of a sword or a hack with a circular saw haha. I don’t know what it says about me but I really enjoy applying blood. The White looks terrific. Who would have thought white armour could be cool but in your capable hands in not surprised. 😊

  8. Gravitas Says:

    See, I have this problem where every time I read a post on your blog I’m tempted to run to my local hobby store and blow the $30 I budgeted for my Captain America: Civil War cosplay and quite a bit that’s been budgeted for “adult” expenses on Heresy Era or Mechanicus or really any models… Sheesh…

    • Teehee, what can I say? 😉 Maybe you should indulge the temptation once at least, to get it all out of your system 😉

      Seriously, though: Cheers for the compliment!

  9. Good work as ever KS. Thanks for putting up the recipe and all.

    Do you plan on doing a lot more in 30K or just a small warband?

    • Cheers, mate! The exact size of the project is still pretty much up in the air at this point. Let’s start with a warband of a squad or so and see where it leads, okay? 😉

  10. Great tutorial, the end results look really good. I think I might pick up some lahmian medium when I get the chance and have a play around with it!
    That last conversion is great, the grizzled, beardy head suits him 🙂

    • Thanks, Remnante! I really love that head and am very happy to have found the right model for it! As for The Lahmian Medium, after taking ages to find a real use for the stuff in my toolbox, it has really become instrumental to this recipe. Excellent stuff!

  11. Geralt Wiwczareck Says:

    wow! These look really cool! Especially the unpainted officer! 😮
    I love the subtle conversions you bring to your models. It really makes them stand out!
    Just a quick question, from what kit does the skull on a hook come (the thing the first marine wears on his crotchguard).
    Greetings from Belgium mate! 🙂

  12. Great dirty white armour and a solid way of painting it as well. I used to paint a DIY chapter with dirty white armour. I did it in a much slower and complex way, using multiple thin layers of white and washes. One thing that I found adding to the models was by adding ever so little of a completely wrong wash/colour the white armour really grew. White is never only white and rarely just covered in brown or black dirt. White has a fantastic ability to suck up all kinds of colours (and every battlefield is filled with more colour than one first imagine, especially city ruins). Try a add a little touch faint blue or green or sepia on the knees and elbows for example.

    • Cheers, Thomas! Slow and complex really isn’t my forté, to be honest 😉

      While I think your advice is quite sound, I think I’ll keep the armour like that, to be honest: I rather like the outcome, and I fear it would be too easy for the different washes to unbalance the look and visual coherency of the models.

  13. I have avoided using white as a dominant colour because of the effort required to get things looking good – this looks like a pretty quick method. Thanks for sharing!

  14. Really cool World Eaters models!
    I love the one with the chainsword, his pose is pretty striking.
    And the paintjob suits the savage combat style of these mad guys, remaining sobre though… amazing job!


    morbäck

  15. Very inspirational stuff, Ive recently got back into minis again after a long break so good to catch up on ideas, thoughts etc, thank you!

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