My first tank ever, pt. 3

My first tank ever was pretty much completed but for a few last details. So let’s have a look at the finishing touches and then, in turn, at the finished model.

The first thing I had to do was build and paint a loading crew for the Basilisk’s rear platform. I thought about howto make these guys look suitably heretical and came up with the idea of combining a pretty standard human model with a hulking mutant carrying the shell to be loaded into the Basilisk’s main cannon.

The first guy was quite easily built. Take a look:


He was made from what I believe are mainly Catachan parts. I gave him a pair of kneeling legs, making him look like he was ready to begin loading the cannon. I also angled his head so he would look at his companion and give him orders.

And while we are on the topic, here’s the secon crew member:





As you can see, I defaulted back to my tried and true recipe of combining an Ork boy body with a totally different head – from the WFB Zombie kit in this case. The head makes the model look twisted and a bit dim-witted, which was exactly the look I was gunning for. I also added a few bitz to further obscure the model’s orky heritage.

The tank shell held by the model is an actual shell, by the way. I even added a small decal depicting a sigil of chaos, although a part of it unfortunately rubbed off when I placed the shell into the model’s hands.

Anyway, here’s the two models interacting with each other:


I also took the opportunity to add one more detail: a flag that had been collecting dust in my bitzbox for ages. Originally a standard for some old WFB Skeletons, I dug it up and added it to the tank as a small visual flourish.

Here’s a detail shot:



The flag itself was painted to look like it had been stitched together from human skin. The face came from an old plastic Chaos Warrior and was added by me. I used Tamiya Clear Red to dab on chaos insignia. I think this flag really gets across the point that these guys are in it for the evulz.

And that was pretty much it. The last thing I did was to use slightly thinned down Vermin Brown  to add patches of rust to the tank’s hull. It turned out that some of the rough spots on the chassis were really quite a boon, since they underlined the look of neglect and rust. I also used Mithril Silver to paint on a couple of paint chips and scratches here and there. Like with all weathering, it was important to know when to stop: I wanted my tank to look decidedly used, but also like it was still in reasonable working order.

And with that, my first tank ever was complete: Let’s have a big picture extravaganza to celebrate the occasion!










That’s the Basilisk from all sides. I think my Traitor Guard colour scheme worked rather nicely, if I do say so myself.

Here’s a couple of detail shots showing some of my favourite parts:

First up, the sides of the vehicle, complete with “aged” decals:



Like I’ve said before, I should definitely have added more kill marks 😉

Here’s then the front of the tank and tank commander….


…and, once again, the guys in the back:




Maybe I’ll be revisiting the back platform at some point, to add some additional ammunition.

And last but not least, let me wind up this post by showing you what may be my favourite detail: The little map I painted for the tank commander:


All in all, this project was a blast: Not only did I have lots of fun painting the tank, it may also have helped me to overcome my fear of painting tanks altogether — we’ll see once I decide to tackle the Rhinos, I guess.

As always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

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3 Responses to “My first tank ever, pt. 3”

  1. Morbious and Mortarion Says:

    Nice work on this dude!! I really like that you put personality into each of your models.
    Awesome work

  2. […] and painting my first Dreadnought seemed like an enormous undertaking. Then came a Defiler, a Basilisk, a Heldrake, the Wargrinder, and, lastly, the Knight, and without even noticing it, I grew more and […]

  3. Great job. Love the crew and the flag.

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