My first tank ever, pt. 2

When we last laid eyes upon My first tank ever, I had managed to complete the conversion and undercoat the whole model with GW Chaos Black.

So there was no way around it: I had to start painting this thing. The largest paintbrush available to me (not a tank brush, mind!) in hand, I sat down and got to work:

Following a recipe I had found by sheer chance while browsing through old issues of WD, the tracks were basecoated in dark bronze (Vallejo Tinny Tin in this case, although you can rest assured that this wasn’t the colour used in GW’s original recipe…) and then drybrushed with GW Boltgun Metal. The result is rather nice in my opinion, and it’s definitely a very quick way of painting tracks without any washes involved!

I then used exactly the same base colours I use on my traitor soldiers: The tank’s chassis was painted with GW Adeptus Battlegrey, and I added GW Mechrite Red on the front third of the chassis. All metal parts were painted with GW Boltgun Metal. The skulls were basecoated with GW Dheneb Stone. Here’s what the model looked like at this point:


Before applying any washes or detailing whatsoever, I added a couple of decals. Doing this at this particular point was key, since it meant that I would be able to “age” and “weather” the decals along with the rest of the tank, making them look far more realistic:


A couple of heretic runes went on the right flank of the tank, while the fuel tank got a nice little warning sign.

I also added some kill marks on the tank’s other flank. Looking back on it now, five seems a little measly, doesn’t it? πŸ˜‰

All the decals were treated with Vallejo Decal Medium, then Vallejo Decal Fix, and finally varnished with Vallejo Matte Varnish. It worked like a charm, making the decals look like they were really part of the tank.

While everything was drying, I began work on the tank commander, laying down base colours virtually identical to the rest of the tank.


I then used a mixture of washing and highlighting to further define the model. Of course I took extra care when working on the face. After the tank commander had been completed, he was glued into the hatch:


The head, in case you were wondering, was made by RSJake and can be bought in his webstore. It was, once again, kindly sponsored by Doombreed, and I thought it was just the perfect choice for a traitorous tank commander (going by the head, I highly recommend RSJake’s stuff: the detail and sculpt are both very nice!).

Anyway, with the tank commander completed, I more or less repeated the process on the rest of the tank: Wash everything liberally with GW Agrax Earthshade, then add Red Gore to the red parts of the chassis. Of course I also painted on some chaos iconography. I wanted it to look like it had been crudely dabbed on by the traitors. And so, after a short while, the tank’s main chassis was finished:




As you can see above, I also added small OSL effects to the chaos icon and sensor array at the front. Nothing too fancy, I just wanted to make those areas pop a little.

The next part I had been looking forward to: I basecoated the large blast shield protecting the loading plattform in the back. I had added a stylised daemon face from a WFB terrain kit which I painted and highlighted in bronze colours. The shield itself was painted GW Mechrite Red and then layered with GW Red Gore, just like the other red parts of the model.

The blast shield pretty much became a “blank canvas” at this point, awaiting further decoration. Take a look:


We’ll get to that in a minute. First, let’s talk about the rest of the model, though: The main cannon and loading platform were very easy to finish: I just painted them silver and then added weathering by washing with GW Nuln Oil or stippling on patches of rust.

I glued all the sub-assemblies together at this point. This is what the model looked like:



As you can see, I added further chaos iconography to the blast shield. I also used yet another OSL effect on the eyes of the metal daemon face. It doesn’t make all that much sense from a technical standpoint, but I think it looks rather cool:




I was already pretty pleased with the tank, although there were some things still missing: I wanted to add some smaller patches of rust and neglect all over the tank’s surface, but I had waited until the model was completely assembled, lest the effect turn out uneven.

The loading platform in the back of the tank was also woefully empty:




So the next stage would be to add the final missing details and to convert and paint the models loading the tank’s main cannon.

Next time on My first tank ever: final details.
Until then, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

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2 Responses to “My first tank ever, pt. 2”

  1. Beautifully done! Love how that’s turned out – great work, man!

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