My first tank ever, pt. 1

To tell you the truth, I have been pretty afraid of tanks for a long time. Of building and painting them, that is.
With all the added size and detail compared to infantry models, and with the myriad of fantastically detailed and expertly weathered IG tanks out there, I always felt rather apprehensive about the prospect of having to get a tank finished one of these days — which may just be the reason for the fact that neither of my Chaos Space Marine Rhinos has seen a speck of colour so far…

But then, my eye was repeatedly drawn to a half-built Imperial Basilisk in my dear cousin Andy’s collection. He had bought the tank quite a while ago for some project or other and then probably lost patience with the thing. And now it sat there, half-finished, in a box. And I couldn’t stop thinking about what an interesting modelling project it would be for my Traitor Guard.

Fortunately, cousin Andy let me have the remains of the Basilisk — probably to stop my constant whining. And so, one sunny afternoon, I sat down to cut my teeth on my first tank ever. So this post (and its sequels) will detail my first experiences in the wonderful world of mechanised firepower 😉

Here’s the Basilisk, pretty much the way it came to me:


As you can see, cousin Andy had fortunately already constructed the tank’s main chassis, so that work was already taken care of.



The downside to this was the fact that some parts of the model were in a rather rough condition. The tracks were also only half-finished, with some parts missing and others already glued in. With the instruction sheet lost a long time ago, I had to painstakingly “reconstruct” the threads — luckily, I had enough spare parts, but the results (as seen above) were not as flawless as I would have liked. But all in all, it was pretty smooth sailing nonetheless.

After the tank’s main body had been completed, it was time to think about the additions I wanted to make to the model. After all, I wanted this to be a traitor tank, a part of the ruinous powers’ forces. So I dove headfirst into my bitzbox and collected all kinds of possible parts:

Here’s a cookie tin filled with the bitz I thought could come in handy for this project:

And here’s an early mockup of my tank commander. It’s basically a regular Imperial tank commander with a special head. I’ll tell you more about it once we are dealing with the different painting stages…


It would have been easy to go totally overboard with the spiky bitz, so I tried not to make that mistake. I did have to use some chaos bitz to replace some original parts that were missing, though (the handrail in the back, for example). Anyway, a relatively short while later, the basic build of the Basilisk was completed:




I also did a first mockup of my loading crew, although I realied that these guys would only realistically be tackled much later:



So after dryfitting everything and cleaning up the conversion, I disassembled the model again. Here are all the sub-assemblies ready for undercoating:


I spraypainted everything using GW Chaos Black, and so half an hour later, the tank was ready for painting:




At this point, I was actually giddy and afraid in equal parts. Would I be able to do this model justice with my paintjob? We’ll find out, in the next installment of “My first tank ever”

Until then, as always, thanks for looking and stay tuned for more!

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2 Responses to “My first tank ever, pt. 1”

  1. Looking good, man! Love the chaos-ification you’ve done, and I’m really looking forward to seeing more. Keep it up!

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