Marax the Fallen: Birth of a Chaos Dread, pt.4

This series of posts chronicles my first Chaos Dread conversion. Last time on “Birth of a Chaos Dread”, we watched the finished model. But who is Marax the Fallen? Let’s take a look:

When I started working on the Chaos Dread, it was really for its own sake: I just really wanted to convert that thing. A LOT. But while the model was taking shape, I started thinking about its background as well. After all, Chaos Dreads are more than machines or vehicles: They’re veterans of a war that has been lasting for ten millennia!

I also thought about how the Dreads’ tendency for insane behaviour would fit into the picture. And after a short time, I had a brief piece of background worked out. Here it is:

Marax the Fallen

When Lorimar ascended to the rank of captain of the 4th assault company, brother Marax stood at his side. Likewise, during the years of the Great Crusade, he proved to be a loyal retainer, time and time again.

But after Marax had undergone the psychosurgical treatments introduced to the legion by its primarch Angron, he began to change. The occasions when Marax would succumb to frenzy and insatiable bloodlust on the field of battle grew ever more frequent. But the negative effects of this development were ignored, for Marax had become an insurmountable warrior. While the World Eaters grew more and more fervent in their worship of Khorne, Marax was one of those who welcomed the bloody rituals. During all this time, Lorimar kept his brother under close scrutiny, for he fearedwhat Marax might become. Though he was a force of nature on the battlefield, his frenzy made him more and more difficult to control.

The Skalathrax campaign, during which the legion tore itself apart in a single night, marked the decisive point in the tale of Marax.  After Kharn the Betrayer had begun the senseless slaughter, Lorimar had to use all of his authority to keep at least his company together as an organised force. But amidst the chaos of blood and flame, he was opposed by Marax. The once loyal battle brother considered Lorimar’s refusal of bloody slaughter to be treason and threw himself at his captain, filled with daemonic rage.

While the World Eaters were tearing each other apart, Lorimar and Marax were locked in a fight for life and death of their own.
Marax was an unfathomably powerful warrior, and his anger transformed him into a whirlwind of destruction, but in the end, it was his rage that spelt his doom: He fell for a feint and was split from groin to gizzard by Lorimar’s axe. The battle was decided.

Even with death drawing near, Marax still tried to reach his foe. When he breathed his last, Lorimar, towering over his shattered body, promised him this: He would receive a grave that was worthy of a true warrior. And he would be feared for eternity.

Apothecary Dumah had to employ every mystery of his art to trap the last spark of life within the shattered form of Marax. But he was successful: Marax was interred into the sarcophagus of a dreadnought and thus sentenced to an eternity of war – truly a worthy grave for a warrior.

Being trapped inside the dreadnought for millennia has irrevocably shattered the Marax’s mind, and all that might have been left of the once proud warrior has been drowned in a sea of bloodlust and insanity. When the 4th assault company is not at war, his eternal grave is secured within a stasis field, which is only deactivated once the battle begins. On the battlefield, he rushes forward like a wild beast, tearing apart enemies and war machines alike with crackling lightning claws, howling with rage and hatred. And it is not easy to decide who fears Marax more: Those who have to face him in battle or the warriors of the 4th assault company, to whom he has become an undying reminder of what will befall them, should they give in to the curse of blood frenzy.

While this story may not be breattakingly original, it helps Marax to become more than a playing piece. And for those of you who read the battle report some time ago, you can now understand the function Marax has for the warriors of the 4th: He is a powerful ally, an asset in war, but he is also a constant reminder of the fate that awaits them.

And that wraps up my little series about the birth of a Chaos Dread, although it was so much fun that I ended up buildung another one. But that, as they say, is a story for another time 😉

As always, thanks for looking, and stay tuned for more!

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Marax the Fallen: Birth of a Chaos Dread, pt.4”

  1. […] rather nicely, it presented a whole new problem: I had already used a juggernaut head when building Marax the Fallen, and I didn’t really want to replicate a motif I had already used […]

  2. […] sized models. A Terminator seemed huge to me back then, and I remember that converting and painting my first Dreadnought seemed like an enormous undertaking. Then came a Defiler, a Basilisk, a Heldrake, the Wargrinder, […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: